Tag Archives: orchestra

Music Plug #5: Christopher Tin

Many of you may be familiar with the award-winning trailer music for Civilization IV, "Baba Yetu".  In addition to winning a Grammy, it's been featured in a number of video game music concerts alongside classics from Nobuo UematsuKoichi Sugiyama, and Martin O'Donnell.

But Baba Yetu is just the first track on a larger, Grammy-winning album of international orchestral/electronic/choral music titled "Calling All Dawns".  Each of the songs on this album is in a different language, and while many are uplifting, all have strongly different themes.  Some are religious; "Baba Yetu" is a setting of the Lord's Prayer in Swahili.  Some are secular; "Rassemblons-Nous" is a French protest song.  All are powerful, rich, and definitely worth listening to.

You can hear the entire thing in sequence here, but you should really go throw some cash at Mr. Tin so he can keep composing.  Since it's in a single video, here's the track list:

  1. Baba Yetu - 0:00 - "Our Father" (The Lord's Prayer in Swahili)
  2. Mado Kada Mieru - 3:29 - "Through the Window I See" (Japanese seasonal poem)
  3. Dao Zai Fan Ye - 8:15 - "The Path is Returning" (Daoist meditation)
  4. Se É Pra Vir Que Venha - 11:31 - "Whatever Comes, Let It Come" (Portuguese meditation on death)
  5. Rassemblons-Nous - 15:46 - "Let Us Gather" (French protest song)
  6. Lux Aeterna - 20:13 - "Eternal Light" (Last movement of the Latin Requiem)
  7. Caoineadh - 24:12 - "To Cry" (Irish "keen", or funeral lament)
  8. Hymn Do Trojcy Swietej - 29:56 - "Hymn to the Holy Trinity" (Polish inspirational song)
  9. Hayom Kadosh - 36:45 - "This Day Is Sacred" (Hebrew hymn of rebuilding)
  10. Hamsáfár - 38:31 - "Journey Together" (Farsi inspirational song)
  11. Sukla-Krsne - 41:23 - "Light and Darkness" (Excerpt from the Bhagavad-Gita)
  12. Kia Hora Te Marino - 43:24 - "May Peace Be Widespread" (Maori benediction)

Music Plug #3: Brahms

I said last time that I'd been planning on plugging Brahms, but I got a little distracted by some other awesome stuff.  And yeah, it feels like a bit of a cop-out to plug one of the most famous Romantic composers, but compared to his contemporaries, I think Brahms gets short shrift.

Ludwig van Beethoven started in the Classical period but paved the way for musical Romanticism. Johannes Brahms started in the Romantic period but created works with the epic solidity of his Classical forebearers.  Brahms' compositions are deep, patient, and philosophically weighty.  He does more storytelling with color and harmony and dynamics (especially in his vocal compositions) than any of his predecessors and the vast majority of his successors.

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